YouTube Changes Ad Revenue Split: No More Sweetheart Deals

As its contracts with producers come up for renewal, YouTube is changing its terms for ad revenue splits, no longer providing major Hollywood players like CBS or Warner Bros. with special deals over smaller names such as Machinima or AwesomenessTV. Previously, YouTube offered up to 70 percent of its ad revenue to encourage film and TV producers to place content on the site. Now that YouTube has exploded in popularity, it plans to keep 45 percent of all advertising profits starting in January. Continue reading YouTube Changes Ad Revenue Split: No More Sweetheart Deals

Intel Looking for Backers to Help Keep Pay TV Service Alive

Intel executives have spoken with Amazon and Samsung in search of a strategic partner willing to back its Web-based pay TV service that it hopes to launch by the end of 2013. If Intel cannot find a backer to help fund and distribute the service, it is possible that the plan will be dissolved. Earlier in the year, Intel executive Erik Huggers disclosed that the company plans to sell an OTT pay service that includes a wide array of broadcast and cable TV networks. Continue reading Intel Looking for Backers to Help Keep Pay TV Service Alive

New Smart TV App Will Remind Viewers When Shows Will Air

Visible World, a New York specialist in interactive advertising, is testing a smart TV app that alerts viewers when a certain program is about to air, even if they are doing something else such as playing a video game or streaming a movie. TV networks are finding it more difficult to get the word out about their shows, but this app may help to solve that issue. The app may also prove helpful for TV networks in determining how effective their promotions are to TV viewers. Continue reading New Smart TV App Will Remind Viewers When Shows Will Air

Cartoon Network: Are Ratings Suffering Due to Netflix Deal?

An analysis of ratings for Turner’s Cartoon Network suggests that children’s cable programmers may be suffering as a result of Netflix deals. At the beginning of 2013, Turner solidified a deal with Netflix that included shows on Cartoon Network and Adult Swim. Since Cartoon Network content became available on Netflix at the end of March, data has revealed that ratings in Netflix households have been 10 percent lower than those of non-Netflix households. Continue reading Cartoon Network: Are Ratings Suffering Due to Netflix Deal?

FilmOn: Broadcasters Score Big Against TV Streaming Service

Television broadcasters including Fox, NBCU, Disney/ABC, Allbritton Communications and Telemundo filed a copyright infringement suit in May against Alki David’s TV digital streaming service FilmOn X (formerly called BarryDriller), which works similarly to the controversial Aereo service, backed by Barry Diller’s IAC. On Thursday, a federal judge in Washington ruled in favor of the broadcasters, issuing a near-nationwide preliminary injunction against FilmOn X. Continue reading FilmOn: Broadcasters Score Big Against TV Streaming Service

Second Screen Apps: Has TV Become the Second Screen?

Television networks are creating companion apps for their successful shows, social TV startups are developing chats and check-ins for second screen experiences, and others are pushing for new ideas to redesign today’s programming guide. But the second screen trend has thus far been based on the premise that the TV screen in the living room is the center of most consumers’ entertainment. Some are suggesting that this viewpoint is no longer accurate and, in fact, may not have been true in the past. Continue reading Second Screen Apps: Has TV Become the Second Screen?

Apple Pitches Ad-Skipping Tech for its Proposed TV Service

Apple has been in discussions with cable companies and television networks for more than a year regarding licensing agreements for a new service that would allow viewers to access live and on-demand television via an Apple set-top box or TV. In recent discussions, the company reportedly told media execs it hopes to offer a premium version that enables viewers to skip ads. According to people briefed on the discussions, Apple would compensate networks for the lost revenue. Continue reading Apple Pitches Ad-Skipping Tech for its Proposed TV Service

Facebook Borrows from Twitter Ad Playbook with Hashtags

Last week, Facebook officially unveiled hashtags to its social platform, following months of speculation. Hashtags are immensely popular on Twitter, while gaining momentum on other social services such as Google+ and Instagram. The move could have significant implications regarding advertising potential and search engine optimization. Facebook is already encouraging brands to start including hashtags in their Facebook ads.  Continue reading Facebook Borrows from Twitter Ad Playbook with Hashtags

Summer Break: Reality Series Exclusively for Social Media

Reality series “Summer Break,” scheduled to premiere on Monday, is taking a nontraditional approach by distributing its content exclusively via social media sites such as Twitter, Tumblr and Instagram. Producer Peter Chernin of the Chernin Group sees the future of entertainment in social media and his new show will test this theory, targeting a younger audience he hopes will turn to their mobile devices to follow the unscripted stories. Continue reading Summer Break: Reality Series Exclusively for Social Media

Netflix and Hulu Plus Most Popular with Mobile TV Viewers

The majority of television content viewed on mobile devices is accessed through Netflix and Hulu Plus, rather than via networks or pay TV providers, suggests a new study commissioned by the Council for Research Excellence (funded by Nielsen). About 64 percent of shows watched on smartphones and 54 percent on tablets were accessed through online video-subscription services, while broadcast and cable websites and apps only accounted for 26 percent of TV viewed on mobile devices. Continue reading Netflix and Hulu Plus Most Popular with Mobile TV Viewers

Networks Develop New Strategies for Second Screen Content

TV networks are producing second screen content related to their original programming in an effort to attract viewers who are increasingly turning to their smartphones, tablets and laptops. The content — which typically includes videos, photos, games and trivia — is intended for viewers who multitask with their mobile devices. According to Nielsen, more than 40 percent of American consumers use their phones or tablets each day as they watch TV. Continue reading Networks Develop New Strategies for Second Screen Content

Cisco Says Online Video to Outpace Social Networks by 2017

According to Cisco’s new Visual Networking Index (VNI) forecast, online video is growing faster than any other type of consumer service, and within four years online video services will be more popular than social networks such as Facebook and Twitter. The report predicts that by 2017 there will be 3.6 billion global Internet users and 19 billion global networked devices. Additionally, the average broadband speed will increase by a factor of 3.5 to 39 Mbps. Continue reading Cisco Says Online Video to Outpace Social Networks by 2017

Google Plans to Develop and Fund Global Wireless Networks

As part of its initiative to connect a billion or more new people to the Internet, Google is planning to build and help run wireless networks in emerging markets such as Southeast Asia and sub-Saharan Africa where connections are not currently available. According to people familiar with the strategy, the planned networks could also be used to improve the speeds of Internet connections in urban areas. Continue reading Google Plans to Develop and Fund Global Wireless Networks

TV Networks Face Unprecedented Challenges in Digital Era

As the upfronts roll out this week in New York City, television networks are facing new challenges: prime time ratings for major broadcasters have been dropping, ad spending is increasingly turning to cable, original programming from the likes of Amazon and Netflix are creating more competition, government regulators are seeking changes to spectrum allocation, and startups like Aereo may impact the subscription revenue of stations. Continue reading TV Networks Face Unprecedented Challenges in Digital Era

Network Interconnectivity Could Lead to Massive Failures

Gene Stanley, a professor of physics at Boston University, and his colleagues discovered the mathematics behind what he calls “the extreme fragility of interdependency.” In systems of interconnected networks like the economy, city infrastructure or the human body, Stanley’s model indicates that a small outage in just one network can make waves through the entire system, resulting in a sudden, catastrophic failure. Continue reading Network Interconnectivity Could Lead to Massive Failures

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