Shred Video Debuts GoPro Editing, GoPro’s Version to Follow

Shred Video, a startup out of Y Combinator, now offers an easy way to turn hours of GoPro video into a 90-second clip with music. Users simply match GoPro footage with songs from their iTunes library, and Shred Video does the rest. The new app identifies moments of action from any acceleration-based sport (think surfing, skateboarding, snowboarding) and highlights video with the beat-drop of the song. Not to be outdone, GoPro plans to release its own mobile editing software by the end of summer.

According to TechCrunch, Shred Video created its editing software based on the predictability of footage.

“We noticed a lot of these videos are the same,” said co-founder Mike Allen. “The video starts with exposition footage, athletes traveling to the venue or giving each other high-fives, and then gets into more of the action. The coolest moves are usually saved for when the beat drops towards the end.”

GoPro_Hero4_Session_Surfer

Shred Video turns hours of footage into a short video in a few seconds. Because the software algorithm is based on detecting acceleration, it doesn’t work with a still camera. The editing software is free, but users pay for saving the video to their computers and removing the watermark.

By end of summer, Shred Video and other third party apps will have competition with GoPro’s own mobile editing solution. TechCrunch reports that GoPro president Tony Bates says the company’s new mobile app “will allow users to trim and share content right from their phones.” This solution will replace what TechCrunch characterizes as its current “clumsy and labor-intensive process requiring the use of convoluted video editing software.”

GoPro’s entry level Hero+LCD camera offers in-camera editing, which is considerably faster than desktop editing. The app is likely a stop-gap measure until GoPro can roll out a cloud solution; Bates reports the company is creating a cloud-based product that allows owners to view, but not edit, GoPro footage on other devices. GoPro’s 72 percent increase in revenue to $420 million now puts the company in the black.