Moto X Contextual Computing Closed to Third-Party Developers

Motorola Mobility says it will not initially allow third party developers to create applications that use the contextual computing capabilities of its new Moto X Android smartphone, which is a feature that makes the phone distinct from its competitors. According to analysts, the move is perceived as an example of how Motorola is protecting what it thinks is its competitive advantage. The company aims to have the Moto X do more, but more efficiently. Continue reading Moto X Contextual Computing Closed to Third-Party Developers

Developers Struggle to Build Ideal Apps for Every Smart TV

Developers face significant challenges in creating apps for smart TVs due to the large number of devices. Most manufacturers have their own platforms, with limited compatibility among them. TV makers are beginning to simplify the programming process by adopting HTML5, while bringing an app to multiple platforms still requires significant resources. Netflix devotes major resources to creating its apps, but few may be able to follow their example. Continue reading Developers Struggle to Build Ideal Apps for Every Smart TV

Netflix Hopes to Bring Increased Intelligence to Smart TVs

Netflix has started a quiet effort to address problems with smart TVs. The company is in talks with tech companies and consumer electronics manufacturers in order to find improvements to user interfaces, remote controls and other smart TV components. The idea of Internet content combined with TVs began in the mid 1990s, but some believe progress has been slow. New apps, services and compelling content are needed to engage viewers to purchase and use smart TVs. Continue reading Netflix Hopes to Bring Increased Intelligence to Smart TVs

New Apple Services Could Eventually Replace Game Consoles

Apple is hinting that it is developing bridges to connect devices, such as smartphones, tablets and laptops to televisions, avoiding the need for dedicated game consoles. In a little noticed announcement at its annual Worldwide Developer’s Conference, Apple revealed that it is allowing third party manufacturers to produce game controllers for iOS devices. Apple will also begin to use new faster Wi-Fi standards to improve services such as AirPlay. Continue reading New Apple Services Could Eventually Replace Game Consoles

Sports Broadcasters Go Free Dimensional for Enhanced Replays

Many argue that 3D television has yet to go mainstream in sports due to the need for special glasses, lack of programming, and the overall expense. Now, 4K video cameras are being used to capture high quality video that can processed by software from Replay Technologies called freeD. It will offer more crisp, wider video views than what is currently offered on HD broadcasts. FreeD can also create multiple angle instant replays that surpass current offerings. Continue reading Sports Broadcasters Go Free Dimensional for Enhanced Replays

Viewer Data Used to Shape Netflix Content and Experience

Netflix’s use of data helps determine what its customers want to watch and how they want it presented. The company’s newest original show, “Orange Is the New Black,” is partially the result of analyzing viewer data. Netflix is using all types of collected viewer data in order to create content and to possibly shape the user experience. Viewer data is collected from multiple sources: Netflix, third party metadata and social media. Continue reading Viewer Data Used to Shape Netflix Content and Experience

Are Millennials More Drawn to Netflix than Other Services?

Millennials are an age group that keep cable executives up at night. Many do not own actual TVs, do not pay for cable, and rarely pay for Internet content. Generally, this generation grew up on free media content. But Netflix offers its original programming in ways that satisfy this generation’s need to have immediate access to content, regardless of when and how. This contrasts with traditional broadcasters airing shows first on TV, then later online. Continue reading Are Millennials More Drawn to Netflix than Other Services?

Google is Testing Personalized Local News for Google Now

Google is testing a local news service as a feature or content “card” in Google Now, its intelligent personal assistant that is currently available in newer Android versions, and in the newest Google Search app for iOS. Local news is a logical addition to Google Now since the personal search assistant’s main purpose is to provide information that is “contextually relevant” to the user, based on interests, time of day, and location. Continue reading Google is Testing Personalized Local News for Google Now

Court Rules Former College Athletes Can Sue Electronic Arts

A federal appeals court is allowing a group of former college athletes to sue Electronic Arts over allegedly using their likenesses in video games without their permission. This is one of two legal actions this year against the company by former college players. EA has claimed First Amendment rights, but the appeals courts have disagreed. The issue also involves the NCAA and calls into question policies regarding profits generated from college sports and players. Continue reading Court Rules Former College Athletes Can Sue Electronic Arts

Writers Profit as Their Comic Books Become Shows and Films

Some comic book publishers are now offering writers a greater share of revenue from comics that end up on the screen. This contrasts to larger comic book publishers that are typically the major beneficiary of published content. Some small publishers have been the source for film and TV studios creating new projects, such as “The Walking Dead” series and the film “2 Guns.” Both were comics, and both are sharing returns with the original creators. Continue reading Writers Profit as Their Comic Books Become Shows and Films

Tech and Pay TV Companies Are Changing How We Watch TV

Intel is one of many companies currently developing home entertainment technologies that could significantly change how viewers interact with TV. Tech companies are integrating advanced features and controls in TV connected devices, from voice activation, DVR and cloud storage sync. Other companies such as cable providers and manufacturers are also introducing advanced TV technologies as well. However, obstacles will come from content licensing. Continue reading Tech and Pay TV Companies Are Changing How We Watch TV

Predictive Search Knows What You Want Without You Asking

Startups and large tech companies such as Google are working on predictive search, a software service that acts as a digital personal assistant, anticipating needs and wants before being asked, and presenting this information to the user. This is the newest development in Web searching, particularly with mobile devices. As it becomes more mainstream, some are concerned about privacy and whether the constant data will be less than helpful. Continue reading Predictive Search Knows What You Want Without You Asking

Point-and-Shoot Cameras Face Decline in the Smartphone Era

Sales for compact, point-and-shoot, digital cameras have declined 42 percent in the first five months of 2013, according to the Camera and Imaging Products Association. Most major manufacturers have been affected, such as Canon, Sony, Panasonic, Olympus and others. The declines are primarily due to smartphones that are replacing the need for stand-alone compact digital cameras, driving manufacturers to focus on premium digital camera lines. Continue reading Point-and-Shoot Cameras Face Decline in the Smartphone Era

Networks Continue Legal Battles with Broadcast Disruptors

Two recent legal cases are creating problems for broadcasters. A federal appeals court refused to rehear a case in which broadcasters attempted to shut down Aereo, a company that allows users to record broadcast TV online, and another appeals court declined a case to prevent Dish Network from selling its Hopper service, which allows viewers to bypass TV commercials. How broadcasters ultimately respond to the disrupters could have a major impact on television. Continue reading Networks Continue Legal Battles with Broadcast Disruptors

Federal Government Faces Decision Whether to Veto ITC Order

In June, the International Trade Commission found that Apple infringed on a Samsung patent, and declared a ban on some older iPhone and iPad models. The trade agency oversees certain unfair trade practices and can block imports and sales of products. The Justice Department and the Federal Trade Commission have been concerned with companies using essential technology patent lawsuits to block rivals, and are troubled with the ITC ruling. The Obama administration is now faced with whether it should veto the order. Continue reading Federal Government Faces Decision Whether to Veto ITC Order

Page 7 of 12«...3456789101112