Facebook Research Aims to Read Minds With Neuroscience

Facebook is at work on a project that would enable users to control virtual reality and augmented reality experiences telepathically. The company unveiled this research in April at its annual F8 conference, and more details have emerged about a technology that could revolutionize the next era of computing. The technology is, however, a long shot, as both neuroscientists and engineers outside the company are dubious that it can succeed. The solution could be a simple headband, rather than the brain implant some companies propose. Continue reading Facebook Research Aims to Read Minds With Neuroscience

HPA Tech Retreat: Understanding the New Digital Acquisition

On the third and last full day of the HPA Tech Retreat in Indian Wells, California, a panel of imaging experts drilled down into some of the more esoteric topics related to 4K and digital acquisition. Among the topics addressed were sensor-lens options for 4K acquisition; solar activity and lit/stuck/dead pixels; design challenges of long-range zoom lenses for 4K S35 digital cameras; video/D-Cinema camera/sensor noise; the role of nonlinear coding of the TV image; and 4K, HDR and imagers. Continue reading HPA Tech Retreat: Understanding the New Digital Acquisition

Fastest Camera Ever Captures 100 Billion Frames per Second

Researchers at Washington University in St. Louis have created a camera that can capture how light moves as it goes through and around objects. The camera may be used to observe body processes, study quantum phenomena, and eventually develop invisibility cloaks. Compressed Ultrafast Photography (CUP), as the technique is known, achieves an incredible speed by converting photons to electrons and recording the time and space data needed to create an image. Continue reading Fastest Camera Ever Captures 100 Billion Frames per Second

MIT Researchers Use Algorithm to Take Pictures in the Dark

Researchers have discovered the ability to create ultrasharp images from barely illuminated objects. This is done by mathematically stitching together information from particles of light. The development will likely be used to support studies of fragile biological materials such as the human eye, that could be damaged or destroyed by illumination. The development could also be used for military surveillance applications in locations with low light.  Continue reading MIT Researchers Use Algorithm to Take Pictures in the Dark