W3C Approves the EME Standard for DRM-Protected Video

The World Wide Web Consortium (W3C), which oversees standards for the web, approved a new system for handling DRM-protected video. Encrypted Media Extensions (EME) work by letting DRM systems connect directly to the user’s browser. EME lets streaming video services protect their content without forcing users to install plugins that can be insecure. But not everyone is happy. Some researchers and advocates of the open Internet believe EME will give browser developers and content providers too much power. Continue reading W3C Approves the EME Standard for DRM-Protected Video

Blippex Hopes to Challenge Google with New Search Approach

Blippex is a newcomer search engine that is essentially built by its users. The site takes users’ submissions in order to provide the data for search results. Its results are different from other popular search engines as it is anonymous and does not identify users. In contrast, Google’s search is not anonymous as its business is based on advertising, with much of it personal and targeted to the user. Blippex will have to prove it can rival the competition. Continue reading Blippex Hopes to Challenge Google with New Search Approach

Will Proposed DRM Framework Keep the Web Relevant?

The World Wide Web Consortium published a working draft last week for Encrypted Media Extensions (EME), which is a proposed framework that enables delivery of DRM-protected media content via browsers without using plugins such as Flash or Silverlight. While the announcement has met with sharp criticism from groups including the Electronic Frontier Foundation and the Free Software Foundation, Ars Technica suggests the framework will help keep the Web relevant. Continue reading Will Proposed DRM Framework Keep the Web Relevant?