Avegant Glyph: Virtual Reality Headset Gets Positive Review

Avegant’s virtual reality headset Glyph features a visually stunning, immersive, 3D retinal display. The $499 Glyph does not have a screen like many of its competitors, including the Oculus Rift. Instead, it uses a projection method emitting light from a low-power LED that reflects light on both eyes’ retinas with lenses and about two million mirrors, so as not to cause eye fatigue. While many people are impressed, there are concerns regarding the headset’s size and cost. Continue reading Avegant Glyph: Virtual Reality Headset Gets Positive Review

Google Aims to Attract Programmers with Glass Developer Kit

Google unveiled its Glass Development Kit (GDK) earlier this week at a Glass hackathon in San Francisco, inviting developers to create third party apps for its wearable technology. The company is looking to lure programmers with parts of Glass that were previously unavailable. Developers can now build Glass apps that work offline, in real time, and use the hardware accelerometer and GPS. Until now, developers were only able to work with the Mirror API. Continue reading Google Aims to Attract Programmers with Glass Developer Kit

Google May Use Glass to Track Consumer Reactions to Ads

Recently discovered patent information suggests that Google may begin using Google Glass to track consumers’ reactions to advertisements. Glass can identify an ad and judge a person’s response by monitoring pupil dilation. This technology could help Google develop a “pay per gaze” system where advertisers get charged each time an ad is viewed through Glass. However, recent reports have indicated that personal data collected from Google Glass apps would not be sold for advertising or marketing purposes. Continue reading Google May Use Glass to Track Consumer Reactions to Ads

Consumers Can Select Viewing Angles for Sports and Concerts

The new OmniCam360 camera system uses a collection of cameras to create multiple angles for live televised events such as soccer matches and music concerts. The system provides viewers with the option to choose their viewing angle, including a 360-degree view of the event. The camera was developed at the Fraunhofer Institute for Telecommunications in Berlin, Germany. Viewers can use a computer, tablet or smart TV in order to select views via their virtual cameras in real-time. Continue reading Consumers Can Select Viewing Angles for Sports and Concerts

Mobile Game App Demonstrates Another Use of Google Glass

The latest example of what can be done with Google Glass is “GlassBattle,” a multiplayer game developed by BrickSimple that can be played while performing everyday activities such as walking or buying groceries. Players can select their coordinates by voice, while viewing the game “board” on a small section of the Glass screen. The game plays similar to “Battleship” with a set grid, and each player taking a turn. The turns of each player are shown on two small grids within the Glass view. Continue reading Mobile Game App Demonstrates Another Use of Google Glass

Bell Labs: Lensless Camera Records Multiple View Images

Bell Labs is developing a new class of imaging device that does not require a lens, but instead uses a light sensitive sensor to create a high resolution image. A new technique known as compressive sensing minimizes redundancy to acquire data with carefully chosen measurements. The camera, which merely features an aperture assembly and a sensor, records images that are never out of focus. Additionally, when using two pixels instead of one, it can create two different images of the scene. Continue reading Bell Labs: Lensless Camera Records Multiple View Images