Numerous Smart Devices May Now Be Secretly Recording Users

Consumers criticized Samsung for recording users through its smart TVs and sending the data to a third party, but other companies reportedly take a similar approach. Many of the audio recordings come from devices with voice recognition, like LG’s smart TVs or Amazon Echo. Such recording of unknowing users is not limited to the living room. Automobiles from companies such as GM and Chevrolet can record and send information about a driver’s speed, location, and their route to work. Continue reading Numerous Smart Devices May Now Be Secretly Recording Users

“Assassin’s Creed Rogue” Game Integrates Eye Tracking Tech

The developers of “Assassin’s Creed” have teamed up with Tobii Tech to provide gamers with the ability to control the camera in the game with their natural eye movement. Tobii Tech calls it an “infinite screen” experience, tracking the user’s gaze at 50 frames per second. Users don’t have to even move their mouse to get the camera to pan or click pause when they look away from the screen. The “Assassin’s Creed Rogue” PC game will be one of the first to include this new technology when it launches early next month. Continue reading “Assassin’s Creed Rogue” Game Integrates Eye Tracking Tech

Tobii Sets Sights on Gamers and Consumers with EyeX Tech

Their last appearance at CES sported a “gaze-controlled” version of the arcade game “Asteroids.” This time around Tobii is dreaming bigger and announced a new partnership with SteelSeries to prove it. The eye-tracking experts are working with the gaming peripheral manufacturer to deliver a unique controller capable of navigating the virtual world in a more natural way. As these devices won’t be available until the middle of this year, however, Tobii is whetting appetites with its new Windows-ready EyeX controllers. Continue reading Tobii Sets Sights on Gamers and Consumers with EyeX Tech

Tobii: Eye-Tracking Controls Finally Coming to Video Games

Tobii announced its partnership with SteelSeries to bring eye tracking to video games with a new sensor bar and the EyeX engine. A prototype at CES demonstrated in-game navigation, menu selection and aiming by using nothing more than players’ eye movements. Developers can preorder the SDK now for delivery in March, and they’ll be able to designate standard mouse and keyboard functions to gaze controls. The device is expected to cost around $100. Continue reading Tobii: Eye-Tracking Controls Finally Coming to Video Games

Myriad Applications Envisioned for Facial Recognition Tech

New technology allows computers to be programmed to recognize facial expressions — even the most subtle, fleeting expressions. Using frame-by-frame video analysis, computer software can read the muscular changes within people’s faces that indicate a range of emotions. Many predict such software will be used via computer webcams to rate how users respond to certain content — like games or videos — and cater to those users’ perceived needs or desires accordingly. Continue reading Myriad Applications Envisioned for Facial Recognition Tech

CES 2013: Tobii Takes Eye Tracking Gaze to the Next Level

Swedish developer Tobii Technology unveiled Tobii REX at CES this week, which the company describes as the first gaze interaction computer peripheral to be made available for the consumer market. It leverages the eye-tracking-based interface Tobii Gaze so that users can control their computers by combining their eye gaze with touch, mouse and keyboard controls. Continue reading CES 2013: Tobii Takes Eye Tracking Gaze to the Next Level

EyeAsteroids from Tobii: Will Eye Control be the New Motion Control?

  • Stockholm-based Tobii Technology is introducing a one-off arcade machine called EyeAsteroids, a game that recognizes eye movement as its control mechanism, dismissing “the idea of using joypads, joysticks or flailing your arms around like a whirligig in order to play games,” reports Pocket-lint.
  • “EyeAsteroids is similar to the classic arcade unit from 1979, but with no physical control mechanism.”
  • The company, known for its eye-tracking communication aids for those with special needs, claims the technology is faster than gesture recognition. According to its website, the company provides related technology for research fields and computer controls in areas including hospitals, diagnostics, vehicle safety, gaming and computer manufacturing.
  • “We believe the addition of eye control to computer games is the most significant evolution point in the gaming industry since the introduction of motion control systems, such as the Nintendo Wii,” said Henrik Eskilsson, Tobii’s CEO. “Gaze interaction is fast and intuitive, adding an entirely new dimension to video game interaction.”
  • The Tobii EyeAsteroids prototype is starting its world tour in New York City today and will be on display at January’s CES in the South Hall.