Cine Gear Expo: Industry Vets Discuss 4K for Cinema and TV

Columbia Pictures’ “After Earth” was screened via a Sony 4K digital cinema projector this weekend during the Cine Gear Expo in Los Angeles. After attendees filled the 500-plus-seat Paramount Theatre on Friday, a second screening was added on Saturday. “After Earth” was among the first feature films produced using Sony’s 4K F65 camera. Sony, Canon and Red are among the major camera makers now able to support 4K. Continue reading Cine Gear Expo: Industry Vets Discuss 4K for Cinema and TV

Theater Owners Pursue Guidelines to Shorten Movie Trailers

The National Association of Theater Owners is proposing a new approach to marketing that will include limiting the running time of movie trailers. The controversial move, which is reportedly part of an effort to provide exhibitors with more control over how movies are marketed inside their cinemas, would reduce trailers to two minutes (30 seconds shorter than the norm). Theater owners have argued that trailers can be too long and often reveal too much of a movie’s plot. Continue reading Theater Owners Pursue Guidelines to Shorten Movie Trailers

Vimeo On Demand Gets Exclusive Distribution of New Movie

Actress Kristen Bell may soon become the poster child for a new era of film production and distribution. Following the success of a new “Veronica Mars” project crowdfunded via Kickstarter, which reached its $2 million goal in just 10 hours, Bell’s upcoming indie film “Some Girl(s)” is slated for a June 28 release in theaters and online through Vimeo’s new VOD platform. This could mark another change in the digital distribution of media. Continue reading Vimeo On Demand Gets Exclusive Distribution of New Movie

Soderbergh Distinguishes Between Cinema and Movies

Last week, filmmaker Steven Soderbergh dissected the business of making movies when he spoke on the current state of cinema at the San Francisco International Film Festival. Soderbergh, who has achieved success in both the Hollywood system and the independent arena, spoke at length about the challenges faced by today’s artists to get their movies screened in theaters. Based on unprecedented demand, Soderbergh gave The San Francisco Film Society permission to post his keynote video and transcript in its entirety. Continue reading Soderbergh Distinguishes Between Cinema and Movies

Paramount Exec Sees Theaters as First Driver of Content

Speaking at the Variety Entertainment Technology Summit, Paramount Film Group President Adam Goodman discussed the need to protect the moviegoing experience, while remaining open to the possibilities that new technologies provide. “With an increasing amount of Paramount’s movies taking advantage of 3D and other innovations in display on the silver screen, he sees theaters continuing to be the first driver of content across the various windows,” reports Variety. Continue reading Paramount Exec Sees Theaters as First Driver of Content

Sony Launches Pilot Program for Content Exchange Platform

During last week’s CinemaCon in Las Vegas, Sony announced that its Digital Cinema Solutions Group is beginning customer trials that will test its “xMassif” Web-based, content exchange platform. According to the company release: “This online marketplace creates a new model for increasing access to alternative, independent and repertory content among content owners, exhibitors and promoters, in an easy-to-use and secure environment.” Continue reading Sony Launches Pilot Program for Content Exchange Platform

Fourth Dimension Effects: Iron Man 3 to Be Shown in 4DX

Starting April 26, “Iron Man 3” will be shown in 4DX (fourth dimension effects) at a theater in Nagoya, located in central Japan. The theater is operated by Korona World chain, which plans to screen 12 titles per year using the new format. 4DX can include tilting seats, blowing wind, odor effects, strobe lights and equipment built into the ceiling that can drop bubbles onto the audiences. A ticket will cost $13 for 3D and $10 for 2D. Continue reading Fourth Dimension Effects: Iron Man 3 to Be Shown in 4DX

Industry Leaders Discuss Possible Change to VOD Window

In an effort to regain revenue lost from shrinking DVD sales, Universal Pictures chairman Adam Fogelson suggested that studios should consider partnering with theaters to test out the idea of premium video on demand. Fogelson made his remarks during a panel discussion at the Cinema-Con convention in Las Vegas this week. Typically, movies are made available on-demand at home about three months following theatrical distribution. Premium VOD would shrink that window. Continue reading Industry Leaders Discuss Possible Change to VOD Window

Distribution of Film Prints May Soon End in North America

The end of celluloid film distribution in North America may come as soon as the end of this year, as the transition from film to digital continues. Michael Karagosian, president of MKPE Consulting, said that by the end of last year, 75 percent of worldwide cinema screens had already made the digital transition. This is expected to be an important topic this week at the annual CinemaCon convention in Las Vegas. Continue reading Distribution of Film Prints May Soon End in North America

Encouraging Numbers: MPAA Releases 2012 Theatrical Stats

The MPAA released its 2012 theatrical statistics report last week. Among the findings, international ticket sales increased 6 percent to $34.7 billion and China is now second to the U.S. in terms of world markets for theatrical films. California and New York had the highest number of moviegoers in the U.S. Per capita attendance may be declining among teens, but the number of moviegoers across all ages was its highest since 2009. Continue reading Encouraging Numbers: MPAA Releases 2012 Theatrical Stats

New Christie Laser Projection System to Brighten 3D Films

Projector maker Christie hopes to quell critics who claim 3D films appear too dark in cinemas by implementing a laser-driven projection technology. The new system is expected to create brighter and more vibrant images. The technology will be used to screen Paramount’s “G.I. Joe: Retaliation” at AMC’s Burbank 16 theater on March 28, the first time that laser projection will be made available for paying audiences. Continue reading New Christie Laser Projection System to Brighten 3D Films

JVC Plans to Ship 8K Projector to Japan Later This Month

JVC first revealed a prototype of its 8K Super Hi-Vision projector at CEATEC in 2008. After five years of development, the company is reportedly ready to ship a product version later this month. The DLA-VS4800, which uses JVC’s e-Shift pixel technology, is expected to initially be made available in Japan for about 25 million yen, or $261,000 U.S. (without the four available lenses). Continue reading JVC Plans to Ship 8K Projector to Japan Later This Month

Report: Worldwide Spending on Movies Up $1.3 Billion in 2012

Worldwide spending on watching movies last year reached $62.4 billion, up from $61.1 billion in 2011 and $60.1 billion in 2010, according to IHS Screen Digest. The numbers include theatrical releases, disc rentals, pay TV VOD and digital retail purchases and rentals. North America accounted for 41 percent of global movie revenue in 2012, although spending on physical media saw a decline. Continue reading Report: Worldwide Spending on Movies Up $1.3 Billion in 2012

The Future of Exhibition and Aesthetics of High Frame Rate Cinema

“’The Hobbit’ gave us a chance to see a movie projected at 48 fps, and, unless he changes his mind, James Cameron plans to show us ‘Avatar 2’ at 60 fps. Others, including Douglas Trumbull, are talking — and working in — 120 fps,” writes Creative COW. While some embrace the change, others are less in favor of disrupting traditional filmmaking and exhibition. “It’s to be expected that many people who’ve spent a lifetime watching and making 24 fps movies object to the look, many calling it similar to TV or video. HFR Cinema simply goes against the grain,” notes the article. Continue reading The Future of Exhibition and Aesthetics of High Frame Rate Cinema

High Frame Rate 3D Version of The Hobbit is Insanely Gorgeous

  • Peter Jackson’s “The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey,” shot in 48-frames-per-second HD, “looks nothing like you’ve ever seen before,” writes Wired. “In the 48-frames-per-second version… Middle-earth in 3D looks so crisp it’s like stepping into the foreground of an insanely gorgeous diorama.”
  • The movie will also be released December 14 in standard 24-frames-per-second, but the HFR 3D version allows for more precise images and smoother 3D action because it doubles the “visual data” and decreases blur during quick camera motions.
  • While the 48-frames-per-second approach is great for action sequences, Wired questions its effectiveness during naturalistic scenes. “The flicker, depth of field and imperfect ‘grain’ that lends character to 35-millimeter film historically fostered a collective dreamlike state for audiences who gathered in the dark to lose themselves in images that were never intended to exactly replicate the ‘real’ world.”
  • “In delivering the kind of high-def detail by which every wrinkle gets full attention, fast frame takes getting used to,” suggests the article. “At times, scenes unfold as if part of an extravagantly well-lit, art-directed reality-based series or soap opera.”
  • The 48-frames-per-second method combined with 3D almost makes the film seem something beyond real, suggests Wired, and definitely takes some adjustment for people used to watching standard film.

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