Nvidia Debuts GeForce Experience Feature for Game Sharing

As part of a beta release of GeForce Experience, Nvidia is introducing GameStream co-op, which allows two gamers to play with a single copy by one streaming the game to another PC. The co-op feature, which resembles Sony’s Share Play feature on PlayStation 4, allows for three different modes of play. It is based on the same technology found in Nvidia’s GameStream service, which lets users stream a game from their PC, over a local network, to another device, such as a Shield tablet.

According to Ars Technica, the difference between GameStream and co-op is that GameStream supports 1080p streaming whereas “co-op will playback 720p streaming at 60 fps using H.264 encoding, with a minimum 7 Mbps upload and download speed recommended.” Streaming is only compatible with the Google Chrome browser (via a plugin) and requires a minimum GTV 650 on the host PC; Nvidia will provide laptop support at a later date.

Nvidia_GeForce_Experience

The three different modes of play include allowing a friend to observe the game; mirroring the controls of the host PC on the guest PC, so the user can take over control of the game; and, last, co-op play.” Ars Technica notes that, “while the observation and mirror modes will require no extra work from developers to implement, some may be required for co-op play.”

Nvidia is also adding a new user interface for GeForce Experience’s ShadowPlay DVR capture site. “A new overlay gives users instant access to ShadowPlay, allowing them to start and stop recording, activate instant play recording (which continuously captures the last few minutes of video), and perform quick edits and upload directly to YouTube,” says Ars Technica.

Twitch streaming and webcam and microphone recording options are also built in.

Nvidia made another change, which will be specifically welcomed by MOBA (Multiplayer Online Battle Arena) gamers: GeForce Experience will increase frame rate — up to 120 fps — rather than use that processing power to optimize for visual fidelity. The result, says Nvidia, is that competitors will enjoy improved responsiveness.