MoviePass Revives Unlimited Plan, Will Offer IMAX, 3D Movies

MoviePass just brought back its unlimited subscription plan launched last August that allows users to see a movie a day for $10 per month. Better yet, chief executive Mitch Lowe declared the company is “absolutely committed” to keeping the plan in place. Two weeks ago, MoviePass limited subscribers to four movies per month. The company has previously experimented with removing subscriber access to some AMC Theatres in major cities and even specific movies, all of which were temporary moves.

Wired reports that the company has also debuted another plan: $8 per month for three movies a month, plus three free months of iHeartRadio All Access music streaming. Lowe also revealed that, by end of May, MoviePass “will introduce plans that include more expensive screenings, like 3D and IMAX, as well as plans to accommodate families and friends.”

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Last week, Digital Trends and other publications reported that MoviePass announced a “temporary promotion” of subscriptions that only allowed for four movies per month with its $10 plan. Although an auditor’s report stated “substantial doubt about [MoviePass’] ability to continue as a going concern,” Helios and Matheson Analytics chief executive Ted Farnsworth, whose company owns most of MoviePass, said he was “not worried about” the company’s viability.

“Our customer service has dramatically improved, we’ve worked out the little bugs with the technology, and we have plenty of money to get through the next year,” he said.

Wired notes that, in response to the changes, Lowe said the company is “fine-tuning this model.” “Everybody wants a consistent offer,” he said. “Believe me, I want a consistent offer.” But Lowe added that, “MoviePass is at least through experimenting with AMC,” stating that the company is “not contemplating or even thinking about removing any AMC theaters.”

“We found out what we needed to find out, and decided that we want to be good partners and provide a good service to our subscribers, and our subscribers love AMC theaters,” he said.

MoviePass is still dealing with some glitches: “subscribers who misuse their membership, using their MoviePass-issued debit cards to make purchases outside the scope of their arrangement,” for anything from buying a more expensive 3D ticket to multiple tickets for a single viewing.

According to Lowe, some subscribers get “multiple MoviePass cards, and resell the tickets for popular screenings for a profit.” One beta program asks “certain members to upload a photo of tickets purchased with their MoviePass card, to confirm that they’re using their subscription as intended.” A user who fails to do so more than once will have his or her account cancelled.

Lowe said the company looks for “a pattern of behavior” — mainly constant switching of devices — rather than frequency of use to detect such actions.